On November 18, NJPW’s annual tag tournament—World Tag League—officially kicks off. World Tag League has roots dating back to NJPW’s MSG Tag League in 1980 when NJPW talent went stateside to participate in a 9-team block-format tournament. The inaugural MSG Tag League was won by the Antonio Inoki & Bob Backlund, who amassed 34 points in the oddly structured league. In case you were wondering the team of Ox Baker and Johnny (no, not Jim) Powers didn’t score a single point. This was a long time ago.

Since 1980, the World Tag League has taken on a couple names becoming the IWGP Tag League, IWGP Tag Title League, Japan Cup Tag League, Super Grade Tag League, G1 Tag League and finally in 2012, it was given its current name: World Tag League.

Since becoming the World Tag League in 2012, the tournament winner has earned the right to challenge for the IWGP Tag Team Championship at the forthcoming Wrestle Kingdom show.

The NJPW World Tag League is held under a points system similar to NJPW’s G1 Climax, Best of the Super Juniors and the recently-completed Super Junior Tag League. Teams receive two points for a win, one point for a draw and zero points for a loss.

This year’s league sees quite a few changes to the format and the scoring. First, World Tag League 2018 features only 14 teams, a drop from the record-breaking 16 teams that participated in last year’s tournament. Secondly, NJPW has changed from the traditional two-block format they’ve used since 2007 in favor of a one-block tournament. What this means is that every single team in the league will face one another as opposed to merely facing teams from their specific block.

What this means is more matches.

A lot more.

Let’s put this into context. Last year, with a record number of teams (16 as mentioned above), we saw 28 matches per block plus a final giving us a grand total of 57 matches. World Tag League is already pretty arduous and comes at a point in the wrestling calendar that makes it easy to skip.

This year, there will be 91 block matches and 92 total when we add in the final. That’s 35 more matches in this year’s World Tag League than last year. There are 61.4% more World Tag League matches this year.

Why? Who is responsible for this?

There was somewhere, somewhere in a meeting that said: “Guys, I think we need 61.4% more World Tag League matches!”

I want to meet this person and tell them how painfully wrong they were. So, so wrong. What’s strange is NJPW reducing the number of shows on the tour from 19 last year to 17 this year.

To say that the idea of going to a single-block is perplexing would be an understatement.



Is It Worth It?

For those new to the World Tag League, I’m probably being harsher than the tournament deserves. It’s fine. There will be some good matches. There will be some bad matches. There will also be a lot of matches that were just there — the type you watch, enjoy and forget about the second you close the NJPW World window.

For me, World Tag League comes at the busiest time in my personal and work life as well as the time period when I begin doing extensive work on our annual NJPW Year in Review eBook. So, I tend to check out during stretches of the tournament only coming in when a match is hyped or there’s a particular matchup that intrigues me.

Beyond my personal level, the World Tag League often doesn’t feature world-beater matches. The G1 Climax it’s certainly not. Last year, the highest rating a World Tag League match received from Dave Meltzer was EVIL & SANADA vs. Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa and they received ***¾ on the 19th and final night of the tour. We had to wait until the tail end of the tournament, well into December to get anything even resembling a great match.

This year’s tournament will air over 17 shows on NJPW World with the first show kicking off November 18 and the tournament concluding on December 9. Being a G1 Climax completist is difficult but often worth it. The same cannot be said for the World Tag League.

Participating Teams

Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino

Previous Appearances: None

The young lion duo of Ayata Yoshida & Shota Umino will be unlikely to score even two points during this tournament but you shouldn’t take that as a reason to skip their matches. Both have star potential down the road and highlight a solid crop of young lions. These two have no love lost as they’ve battled countless times throughout the year but now much work together in this tournament. Yoshida has always been placed just above young lion status so it’ll be interesting to see if he takes any falls this tournament or if Umino is the team’s defacto pin eater. Each match with this duo should be really good so don’t skip even if you know it’ll ultimately result in their loss.

Best Friends (Beretta & Chuckie T)

Previous Appearances: 2017 (8 points)

The Best Friends will undoubtedly lead the Tag League in hugs and may do surprisingly well in this year’s tournament. Beretta will be looking to make up for lost time as he missed a large chunk of the year with an injury. Chuckie will continue to be one of the most consistent wrestlers on the planet. And they will hug. Oh, will they hug! Best Friends matches are rarely bad but almost never reach great status. Expect a lot of Gentlemen’s Three-Star Ratings (fit for a Kentucky Gentleman) but don’t be disappointed if none of their matches reach Match of the Night or Match of the Tournament level.

Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano

Previous Appearances: 2017 (8 points)

Ishii needs new and better friends. What a waste teaming with Yano for this tournament is for one of the best wrestlers in the world. Instead of having potential great matches with this talented roster he’ll be relegated to the serious foil to Yano’s comedy. Like the G1 Climax, Yano serves a purpose. In the summer tournament, he gives guys a night to rest while also balancing out the block scoring by being able to win and lose at will without much in the way of repercussions. Here, he’ll act as the pin-eater for the team which will keep Ishii looking strong throughout. I can understand it and still think it sucks though and I do. It’s a total and complete waste of Ishii but, oh well.

David Finlay & Juice Robinson

Previous Appearances: None

David Finlay first appeared in the World Tag League back in 1998 teaming with Jerry Flynn of WCW Thunder fame. Finlay then returned to the World Tag League 19 years lat… oh, that’s Dave “Fit” Finlay. My bad.

Stupid jokes aside, this will be the young Finlay’s second World Tag League as he appeared last year with MIA young lion Katsuya Kitamura. Juice Robinson will make his third appearance in the tournament as he teamed with Hiroshi Tanahashi in 2016 and Sami Callihan in 2017. Raise your hand if you totally forgot Callihan was in the World Tag League last year.

How this team performs throughout the tournament will be the big question. Finlay is perpetually slotted in the or just above the young lion threshold whereas Robinson has won major singles titles this year. This lets us know that Finlay will be taking the falls but you have to wonder how many. Does a Finlay team go 0-for like he did last year with young lion Kitamura or do they have some actual competitive matches with Robinson coming away as the victor? They have next to no chance of winning the league but could be shockingly competitive until the final few nights.

Guerillas of Destiny (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)

Previous Appearances: 2016 (12 points), 2017 (10 points)

GoD has participated in two World Tag Leagues and made the finals both times. Ultimately, they’ve lost each tournament but its an impressive resume nonetheless. I’m not a betting man but if I were, I’d have them out of the mix this year. The 1-block format doesn’t require them to stand out in a block so while I see them remaining near the top of the standings all tournament, ultimately I think they miss out to a newer, more fresh duo.

I’m also a bad better so I wouldn’t be shocked to see them in the finals again. GoD become the annual bridesmaid of the World Tag League wouldn’t be the worst story to tell.

These guys are hit or miss. Sometimes they have a match that stuns you with its competency and other times you’re wondering why they are even on the roster anymore. In prior years they’ve entered the league as a team receiving near-universal scorn but left as one of the best team’s of the tournament. They just never know. Given Tama Tonga’s current character as leader of the “OG” Bullet Club, you should expect plenty of interference and cheating throughout the tournament. These guys can either be the savior of the tournament or the reason it’s mocked. You just never know.

Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin

Previous Appearances: 2017 (8 points)

Well, this is awkward. Either someone is playing a cruel trick or they are just completely ignorant. Last year, text messages featuring Elgin making disparaging remarks about Cobb (including the way he smells) made the rounds. Worse yet, these took place during the Tag League tournament. Cobb and Elgin seemed to put it behind them and work through the tournament but other wrestlers on the tour or more specifically Ray Rowe and Hanson of War Machine were less than thrilled with Elgin’s comments and actions. On one night, War Machine stared at the camera and shouted “FUCK MICHAEL ELGIN!”

And now they are back. For all, we know Cobb and Elgin are fine and the whole ordeal was water under the bridge. Or things are going to be really, really awkward all month.

In-ring, this team should be spectacular and add a much-needed dose of power wrestling to the tournament. Cobb fits like a glove in NJPW and specifically this tournament while real-life drama aside Elgin has been consistently great throughout his NJPW appearances. They have no chance of winning the tournament but should collect some fun upsets and surprise wins across the month.





Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr & Lance Archer)

Previous Appearances: 2012 (8 points), 2013 (10 points), 2014 (8 points), 2017 (10 points)

KES are veterans of the World Tag League as they’ll approach their fifth appearance as a team this year. Archer saw success in his first WTL appearance winning the whole thing with Suzuki-gun leader Minoru Suzuki in 2011. Archer has been unable to replicate that success with his more regular partner Davey Boy Smith Jr. as the duo has topped out at 10 points in both 2013 and 2017.

This year doesn’t appear to be their year either as upstart teams like EVIL & SANADA seem more poised to take the tournament. Don’t entirely count out KES though, a finals appearance isn’t out of question and it wouldn’t be completely out of the realm of possibility that they win the whole thing, but it’s unlikely.

EVIL & SANADA

Previous Appearances: 2016 (10 points), 2017 (10 points) – Tournament Winner

EVIL & SANADA come into the 2018 World Tag League as heavy favorites to repeat their championship from the year prior. If the LIJ duo makes it two-in-a-row they will join a distinguished list of back-to-back World Tag League winners including Antonio Inoki & Hulk Hogan, Hiroshi Hase & Keiji Mutoh and Togi Makabe & Tomoaki Honma. Given that Makabe & Honma went back to back in 2015 and 2016, it would be back-to-back… back-to-back winners which is weird given the otherwise rare instances of this occurring (Hase & Mutoh did it all the way back in 1993 & 1994). Still, without a clear direction at Wrestle Kingdom 13 for either man and their status among the upper half of the NJPW totem pole, you have to think they are favorites to win the whole thing and be in the featured IWGP Tag Title match at Tokyo Dome.

Their performances last year were hit or miss with some of the best matches of the entire tournament but not a catalog of high-profile great matches. They have had even more time to build their rapport and are without a doubt one of the most popular tag teams in the company. The fans will love everything they do so their matches will be among the most entertaining each next.

Bet the house.

Manabu Nakanishi & Yuji Nagata

Previous Appearances: 1998 (6 points), 1999 (10 points), 2001 (8 points), 2003 (9 points), 2007 (6 points), 2014 (6 points), 2015 (4 points), 2017 (4 points)

This team has seen some shit. Nakanishi and Nagata are the grumpy old man duo of this year’s tournament, first appearing as a unit back in 1998. Their individual legacy’s in the league span longer than that as Nakanishi participated in his first World Tag League all the way back in 1992 when he teamed with the legendary Tatsumi Fujinami.

While synonymous with Nakanishi in the World Tag League, Nagata has won the World Tag League with other partners including Takashi Iizuka and Wataru Inoue. Along the way, he’s teamed with the likes of Dragon Gate’s Masaaki Mochizuki as well as the not-yet-Bad King Fale in 2011.

Nakanishi has carried many partners throughout the league’s history including the likes of Strong Man, Takao Omori, Yutaka Yoshie, Shinya Hashimoto, and then-young lion Henare.

This team hasn’t been competitive in years as you have to go back to 2003 to find a year when they were even a minor factor in this tournament. For those new to NJPW, old guys don’t do well. They aren’t main eventing supershows and they aren’t getting the better of young talent. There’s a respect no doubt and they can mix it up from time-to-time but when push comes to shove, they lose more than they win to the next generation.

Keep an eye out for Nagata’s grumpiness, particularly against the young lion team and ready yourself for the bi-yearly Nakanishi gives 110% in a match that could very well come during this tournament.

Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka

Previous Appearances: 2014 (7 points), 2017 (6 points)

This unholy Suzukigun alliance is designed exclusively for Suzuki to have a pin-eater in Iizuka. We’ll touch on this again with the next team which is more clearly a team designed to protect. Yes, we all agree that Suzuki and Sabre would’ve made a better team for the purposes of great matches and stakes but, who takes the fall there? Sabre is clearly being positioned for bigger and better things and Suzuki remains one of the pillars of New Japan, even if he steps behind where he was a few years ago.

This team stinks, there’s no way around it. Suzuki hasn’t been a full-effort worker in some time and Iizuka can give all the effort he wants but it doesn’t hide the fact that he’s one of the worst workers on the roster.

This team will be lucky to best the 6 points they had last year.

Taichi & Zack Sabre Jr.

Previous Appearances: None

Same story, different names. Zack Sabre Jr. may have been slotted as a pin-eater when he first arrived in NJPW but those days are long gone. Sabre is a pushed commodity and the company has high hopes for him. What this alliance tells us is that Taichi—who just recently lost the NEVER Openweight Title—is the team pin-eater. Taichi goes from singles title holder to World Tag League pin-eater in just a month, quite the precipitous fall.

This will mark Taichi’s first World Tag League since 2008 when the then-Taichi Ishikari teamed with current NJPW commentator and LIJ foil Milano Collection AT. Sabre comes in as a World Tag League virgin making his first-ever appearance.

TenKoji (Hiroyoshi Tenzan & Satoshi Kojima)

Previous Appearances: 1999 (10 points), 2000 (8 points), 2001 (8 points) – Tournament Winner, 2008 (8 points) – Tournament Winner, 2012 (8 points), 2013 (8 points), 2014 (8 points), 2015 (4 points), 2016 (8 points), 2017 (6 points)

The most prolific team in World Tag League history, TenKoji makes their 11th appearance in the annual tag tournament. What’s more, both Tenzan and Kojima have wide-reaching histories in the tournament as Kojima’s World Tag League history begins in 1996. Kojima is also a three-time winner of the tournament, winning once with Keiji Mutoh in 1998 and twice with Tenzan in 2001 and 2008.

Unfortunately, we are 10 years removed from this duo’s last World Tag League championship and this year should be no different. The team has been slotted in the 4-8 point range since they last won in 2008. This year given the competition, both men’s health and their current state of marginalization, I wouldn’t be stunned to see them struggle even getting to four points.

Kojima can still go and Tenzan is due for a few good performances here and there. Don’t sleep on TenKoji matches particularly when they are matched up with younger teams but don’t be too surprised to see them taking losses left and right.

Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi

Previous Appearances: 2016 (8 points), 2017 (8 points)

You think they’ll get 8 points this year?

This is Page & Yujiro’s third-straight appearance in the World Tag League and they’ve had exactly 8 points in both years. Can they make it three-in-a-row?

Look, there’s not a lot to write about this team. Yujiro will take any pinfall they have. Page will be the pushed commodity and most of their matches won’t be good because most World Tag League matches aren’t that great and Yujiro isn’t a very good wrestler. Page has improved tremendously in the last year and a half but he’s not good enough to carry a team with Yujiro through NJPW’s least-productive tournament.

Toa Henare & Togi Makabe

Previous Appearances: 2017 (2 points)

Another run for our resident young and old team as Henare teams with NJPW veteran Togi Makabe. Last year the duo only amassed 2 points but Henare was still in his young lion or young lion adjacent phase. This year, he comes in with a new name “Toa”, new gear and a renewed sense of worth. Henare isn’t a pushed wrestler just yet but he’s firmly above the young lion status. What this means is the potential for a few more wins for this duo and maybe even a surprise pinfall or two from Henare.

They won’t make a big splash in terms of standings but this team should improve upon their 2 point performance from last year.

The biggest story with this team is that it exists again. Last year, Makabe’s Great Bash Heel teammate Tomoaki Honma was out with injury. He returned this year and was working as recently as the last tour. Honma is not in World Tag League this year. Is he hurt again? Have his (let’s be honest here) bad performances since returning knocked him out? I’d love to know what happened here. As far as I can tell Honma was a part of World Tag League marketing even a few weeks ago. I’m fine with this Makabe & Henare team as they will probably have better matches than Great Bash Heel would. Still, it’s odd to see former World Tag League champions not in this year’s tournament even though both are presumably healthy.





Non-World Tag League Tour Highlights

This begins and ends with Night 10 from Korakuen Hall which features a main event of Taiji Ishimori, Bad Luck Fale & Jay White vs. KUSHIDA, Kazuchika Okada & Hiroshi Tanahashi.

Yes, Tanahashi and Okada on the same team. This is big. After the handshake that nearly blew the roof off, Okada and Tanahashi are now teammates. If this were WWE we would’ve seen at least 20 Okada/Tanashi forced to be partner tag matches and maybe even a token WWE Tag Title run between the legendary foes. But in NJPW, that doesn’t happen. These guys have never been on the same side of the ledger in their careers and thus never on a team together (ignoring Okada’s young lion run). While it may seem like a significant mid-tour Korakuen Hall show but it’s not. Okada and Tanahashi will team a few times in the following show against various collections of Bullet Club talent. Seeing an Okada hot tag to Tanahashi is going to be a sight to be seen.

For a full schedule of the World Tag League 2018, visit NJPW1972.com

World Tag League 2018 – Tag League Schedule

November 17
Chichibunomiya Memorial Gymnasium, Kanagawa, Japan

FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino
TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi
Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta) vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)

November 18
Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan

  • Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)

November 20
Takaoka Techno Dome, Toyama, Japan

  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Togi Makabe & Toa Henare
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)

November 21
Shibata-shi Culture Center, Niigata, Japan

  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino
  • Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA) vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)

November 23
Culttz Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson)
  • Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA) vs. Togi Makabe & Toa Henare

November 24
Kuki City Gymnasium, Saitama, Japan

  • The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)

November 25
Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium, Aichi, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson)
  • BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)

November 26
Yoshitsune Arena, Ishikawa, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)

November 28
Mito Municipal Gymnasium, Ibaraki, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)

November 29
Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan

  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. Best Friends(Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi) vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)
  • Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)

November 30
Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan

  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson)
  • The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano)
  • BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa) vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)

December 2
EDION ARENA OSAKA, Osaka, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano)
  • BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)

December 3
Kochi Prefectural Gymnasium, Kochi, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano)
  • Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta) vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)

December 4
Kobe Sambo Hall, Hyogo, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA)

December 6
Yamagata Big Wing, Yamagata, Japan

  • Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino vs. CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin
  • The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan)
  • Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta) vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)

December 7
Yurihonjo Arena, Akita, Japan

  • TenKoji (Satoshi Kojima & Hiroyoshi Tenzan) vs. Suzuki-gun (Minoru Suzuki & Takashi Iizuka)
  • Yuji Nagata & Manabu Nakanishi vs. Ayato Yoshida & Shota Umino
  • FinJuice (David Finlay & Juice Robinson) vs. Best Friends (Chuckie T & Beretta)
  • Jeff Cobb & Michael Elgin vs. The Elite (Hangman Page & Yujiro Takahashi)
  • Los Ingobernables de Japon (EVIL & SANADA) vs. Killer Elite Squad (Davey Boy Smith Jr. & Lance Archer)
  • Togi Makabe & Toa Henare vs. Suzuki-gun (Zack Sabre Jr. & Taichi)
  • CHAOS (Tomohiro Ishii & Toru Yano) vs. BC OGs (Tama Tonga & Tanga Loa)

December 9
Iwate Industrial Cultural Center Apio, Iwate, Japan

  • NJPW World Tag League 2018 – Final Match